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Tag Archives: social-emotional


Preschool Resources

Every student’s first teachers are their family members. I hope to use this page to provide you with resources and ideas on how to best work with your student at home, to best support academic and social-emotional development and achievement. Check out some of my favorite resources be sure to check back later for more!


 

Social-Emotional Development

Before students can achieve their fullest academic potential, they must develop strong social-emotional skills, such as delaying gratification, managing strong feelings, and being able to interact appropriately with peers and teachers. The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations of Early Learning provides fantastic strategies, resources, and social stories to use with preschool children to build these skills. We use a lot of these strategies in our classroom, too!


 

Language Development

Every student has a voice that deserves to be heard. Always encourage your child to verbally express himself or herself to meet his or her wants and needs. Ask your child questions and encourage them to ask you questions about the world they see around them. Ask them about their day, and encourage them to tell you all of the details – who, what, where, when, how, and why. And share with your day with child, too! Narrate everything you do, and explain why you are doing it. This will not only help to build your child’s vocabulary and use of language, but will also help them to make connections about the world around them.


 

Academic Development

Teaching your child literacy and math skills can be fun! Rather than using workbooks or practicing rote memorization skills to build alphabet and number knowledge, encourage your child to notice all of the letters and numbers that surround them everyday. They can look at the numbers and letters on menus, on signs, on food packages – there are endless opportunities to point out letters and numbers to your child. Once they see you start pointing them out, they will want to, too. This will help them to start differentiating between different letters and numbers.

You can push in math and counting skills in the same way. There are opportunities all around us to push in counting, quantification, classification, patterning, and measuring skills. Have your child set the table and count out how many plates, forks, spoons, and knives you will need. Note the patterns that they have on their clothes. Count the number of steps there are in your house. Have your child help you measure out the ingredients when cooking! By pointing out, narrating, and explaining these things in the world around them, children will begin to independently use these skills, and to connect these academic skills to their lives.


 

I hope you enjoyed these resources and ideas! Please email me at rktodd@cps.edu if you have any questions, or would like to learn more about any of these strategies. If you are a parent of a 101 student, be sure to check your email inbox weekly for our newsletter, which always includes more resources to work with your student at home. I will be posting more here, soon, as well.

Thanks for reading!

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